Dubai sees cargo and pax continue to rise

“Although passenger numbers grew by 21.8 per cent, total aircraft movement rose just 9.6 per cent, indicating that load factors and average aircraft sizes had increased.” The strongest traffic increases were seen on routes to North America, Russia and Asia while the highest passenger volumes were generated by traffic to and from India, UK, Iran, […]


“Although passenger numbers grew by 21.8 per cent, total aircraft movement rose just 9.6 per cent, indicating that load factors and average aircraft sizes had increased.” The strongest traffic increases were seen on routes to North America, Russia and Asia while the highest passenger volumes were generated by traffic to and from India, UK, Iran, Germany and Pakistan.

Griffiths added that while he expected last week’s European airspace disruptions to have an impact on April’s traffic figures, the strong surge of traffic created as airlines cleared the backlog would help make up the difference.

Dubai’s passenger traffic has increased by a yearly average of 10 per cent since 1980, rising from three million travellers then to more than 40 million last year. The increase in growth at Dubai International Airport last year versus 2008 was almost 20 per cent, despite the global recession and air cargo has grown by an average 14 per cent per year in the same period. This year, visitors to Dubai will pass the 10 million mark – almost double the number of visitors to Australia.

By 2030 – Dubai Airports has forecast passenger traffic at both its fields will reach 150 million per annum, along with 17 million tonnes of cargo and 750,000 yearly aircraft movement.