Canada’s not-so-open skies

The sooner governments – including Canada’s – truly understand that and let airlines get on with the difficult business of running their business, the better off consumers will be, whether they be passengers, consumers of goods, or supply chain stakeholders. The longer it takes Canadian officials to get over their irrational fear, the further the […]


The sooner governments – including Canada’s – truly understand that and let airlines get on with the difficult business of running their business, the better off consumers will be, whether they be passengers, consumers of goods, or supply chain stakeholders.

The longer it takes Canadian officials to get over their irrational fear, the further the country will be pushed onto the sidelines of global trade, particularly as the US takes centre field in the game of open skies.

As an example, a recent study by the International Institute of Transport and Logistics found that a full open-skies agreement with Japan alone, would increase passenger traffic by 16 per cent, reduce fares by more than 10 per cent and bring in an additional CND$55 million for Canada’s tourism industry. Not small change.

As the three Premiers succinctly put it in their editorial: “Open-skies agreements are simply the right thing to do in today’s interconnected, global, and open tradebasedeconomy.”