Atlas Air flourishing in challenging times

As far as the air cargo industry goes, Atlas Air Worldwide Holdings occupies a rare patch of ground. It has the enviable position of seeing demand for its solutions whether the global economy and hence the air cargo industry, be sky-high or down in the dumps as it currently is. Donald Urquhart has the story.


Atlas Air flourishing in challenging times


Utilising its all-Boeing fleet of nearly 50 aircraft Atlas also undertakes ACMI services for a number of air cargo operators including Emirates SkyCargo, Etihad Crystal Cargo, Qantas Freight and of course British Airways Cargo (BAC) and Panalpina which are being serviced with Atlas’ new B747-8Fs. One of these is in use with BAC and two with Panalpina. Two more B747-8Fs will join the Atlas fleet this year and two more in the first half of 2013. The group’s Titan Aviation also has four aircraft – one B757 and three B737-800s – in operation in China and Kenya.

“So we’ve clearly shown that the outsourcing model works, whether it’s in the cargo or in the passenger field and with different fleet types. The critical component here is that you have to create the kind of scale and have the most effective and efficient fleet to be able to give that kind of value back to the customer,” says Steen.

“We have been fortunate to have the ability to become the market leader, we have the largest and most efficient B747 fleet so we can provide that value to our customers and we also have long standing partnerships with key customers that are strategically focused on their particular businesses, whether it’s cargo or passenger and we have a very strong balance sheet so we have the ability to reinvest in aircraft and take that risk for the airlines and of course with the long term partnerships that makes for a very powerful mix.”