A post e-freight world

The other day I came across an interesting blog post on the future of data exchange.


A post e-freight world


Indeed this could well be turned into a cautionary tale if one looks to the e-freight example and reads between the lines. In the much troubled e-freight saga certainly this is one big criticism – that the IT providers were not fundamentally enough involved from the very beginning. That complaint is mostly muttered on the sidelines of events like the World Cargo Summit, but a voice that has otherwise remained relatively mute, perhaps not wanting to bite the hand that will eventually feed it. To be fair, the process was radically overhauled and made far more inclusive once the environment changed at IATA back a few years ago and greater industry cohesiveness was forged in the form of GACAG, for instance. The problem was, it was just very late in the game. In his blog Sangster notes that e-freight’s principals, potential from data collection and flexibility of dissemination of this data using new technologies holds great potential for the industry. But there is a qualification: “As long as the programme remains flexible and inclusive of all participants from a technology and cost perspective it lays the foundation for the collaborative data management world that is on our doorstep.”

As the new Cargo-XML schema becomes widespread, says Sangster, the flexibility to provide enhanced data and additional information will allow for easier and more affordable methods of implementing data exchanges to meet the market’s requirements. These requirements are likely to be far more sophisticated and complicated than today, driven not just by commercial (in part driven by the increasing range of options technology will create), but regulatory needs as a result of expanding cargo security requirements.