North America snapshot

In this issue we bring you a snapshot of the US and Canadian air cargo market with our annual Americas Supplement. With a sampling of airports and carriers we hope you find it informative.


In this issue we bring you a snapshot of the US and Canadian air cargo market with our annual Americas Supplement. With a sampling of airports and carriers we hope you find it informative.

Their situation in that part of the world is really not that different than elsewhere, other than the fact that for the carriers there, they either luckily or cleverly (depending how you see things) made the transition out of freighters well before the capacity glut hit the industry. As such they haven’t been hit as hard as a number of carriers around the world that still have substantial fleets of freighters – with notable exceptions of course, but that’s a topic for another day.

Much of the North America story – both airports and carriers – is similar to other parts of the world, traditional cargo sources have changed and the need for specialized products and value-add is crucial in today’s world. And, with the new modern long-haul, widebody aircraft – the B787 and A350 – gradually swelling the ranks of carrier’s fleets in addition to the minifreighter B777s, this is also proving to be a paradigm shaker.

Before I sign off and send this edition to the printer, one quick look at the latest statistics from WorldACD which just landed in my inbox this afternoon.

The picture presented in their data is of really not much change in the global air cargo market, although Asia Pacific looks to be clawing its way back to a more typical growth scenario. With a modest year-on-year (YoY) weight growth of 1.8 per cent worldwide, July did not consolidate the upswing that emerged in June, when growth hit a surprising 3.0 per cent YoY.

In specific origin areas growth ranged from 0.2 per cent in Europe to 3.7 per cent in Asia Pacific. The latter looks to be on its way to reclaim the position of air cargo’s engine as Europe is losing a bit of its recent lustre, WorldACD noted. In terms of yields, measured in USD, the news was slightly better, as the worldwide yield remained stable month-on-month (MoM). Only Europe and North America had a yield drop compared to June, all other origin areas showed a slight increase. But for the year 2016 through July, USD-yields dropped the most in Asia Pacific (-21 per cent).

For more analysis and discussion on the hot topics impacting the global air cargo sector, join us at our annual Conference which will be held in Hong Kong this coming 28-29 September. For more information check out our websites at: conference.payloadasia.com and awards.payloadasia.com.

See you in Hong Kong!