An eye on the radar

There seems to be not a day that goes by that another set of data comes out looking pretty much the same as the data that preceded it a month earlier. It’s tempting to call it depressing, but I think any sense of depression in the industry has long since been replaced with weary numbness. […]


There seems to be not a day that goes by that another set of data comes out looking pretty much the same as the data that preceded it a month earlier. It’s tempting to call it depressing, but I think any sense of depression in the industry has long since been replaced with weary numbness.

But one other thing is clear – the industry as a whole knows the heady days of yore are gone, most likely for good and the age-old ways of conducting business just don’t fly anymore in this super interconnected Internet world. Every single industry conference these days touches on many of the breaking trends.

It does show that the industry, at least in a small way, is embracing the change that is happening all around at an increasingly breakneck speed. Figuring out exactly how these new trends can be tapped by an industry notoriously slow at adapting is the real challenge. One industry resource well worth checking out is DHL’s 2016 Logistics Trend Radar. It is basically how DHL sees 26 key trends coming between now and the next five years and then between five and 10 years.

Th ere are of course some familiar faces in DHL’s list, which it breaks down into Technology Trends and Social & Business Trends. Within the next five years on the tech side of the equation DHL sees big data, low-cost sensor technology, cloud logistics, augmented reality, the Internet of things, robotics & automation all being key trends. Further out to a 10 year horizon it lists bionic enhancement, digital identifiers, self-driving vehicles, 3D printing, unmanned aerial vehicles and self-learning systems.