Cue public address system

But, it quickly appeared that was an erroneous conclusion on our part, as shortly after the advertisement came out a company rather bizarrely named, Splunk n’ Dash (henceforth known as Splunk), crept out of the woodwork to lay claim to the three, rather worn-looking -200Fs. Expressing incredulity that the MAWB would so hastily sell off […]


But, it quickly appeared that was an erroneous conclusion on our part, as shortly after the advertisement came out a company rather bizarrely named, Splunk n’ Dash (henceforth known as Splunk), crept out of the woodwork to lay claim to the three, rather worn-looking -200Fs.

Expressing incredulity that the MAWB would so hastily sell off the three aircraft, the folks over at Splunk claimed they are now the rightful owners of the trio of jumbos which have been parked at Kuala Lumpur International Airport (KLIA) since mid-2010.

Unfortunately for Splunk a bit of clear air turbulence has struck. In short, the MAWB doesn’t believe Splunk n’ Dash!

And really can you blame them!?! The plot thickens! Media reports identifi ed the owner back in 2010 as leasing company Air Atlanta Icelandic (AAI) – who subsequently deregistered the aircraft and dissolved responsibility for them when ownership was transferred to China-based Shaanxi Sunshine Cargo. Since then, Splunk, which is apparently in the (very wise) process of renaming itself Swift Cargo (whose chief executive by the way, goes by the name Blue Peterson), has come out to state that the actual owner was not AAI but Flugvik EHF, an Icelandic company in Reykjavik who leased them through various entities to AirAtlanta Icelandic.