B737 MAX LEAP-1B begins extensive tests

Boeing and CFM International announced that they successfully initiated flight testing of the LEAP-1B* engine on 29 April on a modified B747 flying testbed at GE Aviation Flight Test Operations in Victorville, Calif.


B737 MAX LEAP-1B begins extensive tests


Boeing and CFM International announced that they successfully initiated flight testing of the LEAP-1B* engine on 29 April on a modified B747 flying testbed at GE Aviation Flight Test Operations in Victorville, Calif. The testing is the next major milestone in a two-year program that will culminate in engine certification in 2016 and delivery of the first Boeing 737 MAX in 2017. The engine performed well and completed multiple aeromechanical test points at various altitudes during the five hour, 30 minute first flight.

Over the next several weeks, the flight test programme will encompass a comprehensive test schedule that will gauge engine operability, stall margin, performance, emissions and acoustics. It also will further validate the advanced technologies incorporated in the engine, including the woven carbon fiber composite fan, the Twin-Annular, Pre-Mixing Swirler (TAPS) combustor, ceramic matrix composite shrouds in the high-pressure turbine and titanium aluminide blades in the low-pressure turbine.

“The LEAP engine has been doing incredibly well throughout a very rigorous ground and flight test program,” said Allen Paxson, executive vice president, CFM International. “Results to date are right in line with what we predicted and where we wanted this engine to be.” To date, the 737 MAX has accumulated 2,724 orders from 57 customers worldwide.