Singapore world’s 3rd most connected country: DHL

DHL, Global logistics provider, has released the third edition of its Global Connectedness Index (GCI) revealing a recovery in global connectedness to pre-financial crisis levels and ranking five Southeast Asian economies – Malaysia, Vietnam, Cambodia, Hong Kong SAR and Singapore – as top global connectedness outperformers relative to their size and levels of economic development.


Singapore world’s 3rd most connected country: DHL


DHL, Global logistics provider, has released the third edition of its Global Connectedness Index (GCI) revealing a recovery in global connectedness to pre-financial crisis levels and ranking five Southeast Asian economies – Malaysia, Vietnam, Cambodia, Hong Kong SAR and Singapore – as top global connectedness outperformers relative to their size and levels of economic development.

 

The report, a detailed analysis of 140 countries, measures depth and breadth of connectedness by cross-border flows of trade, capital, information and people. Ranked third in the GCI, Singapore is a regional leader and the only non-European country in the top 10. It earns its top rank primarily because of the depth of its international integration relative to the size of its domestic economy.

 

Other top 50 ranked performers include Hong Kong SAR at 11, Korea at 13, Taiwan at 18, Thailand at 19, Malaysia at 21, New Zealand at 31, Australia at 32, Vietnam at 33, Japan at 40, and Cambodia at 48. China is ranked at 84, India at 71 and Indonesia at 111. Japan and Korea continue to be ranked in the top 10 countries on the breadth dimension of global connectedness, which measures how broadly the international component of a given type of activity is distributed across countries.

 

Five Southeast Asian economies – Malaysia, Vietnam, Cambodia, Hong Kong SAR and Singapore – stand out for their high depth scores relative to the structural characteristics of their size and level of economic development. The GCI notes that countries in this region have particularly high trade pillar scores reflecting their integration into cross-country supply chains as well as national policies that have boosted their depth scores. The performance of Cambodia and Vietnam are particularly striking, as both are lower middle-income countries.