CHEP trials energyharvesting technology

ULD management company, CHEP Aerospace Solutions, has developed a tracking device powered by solar panels attached to a part of the ULD that tends to sustain least damage.


CHEP trials energyharvesting technology


ULD management company, CHEP Aerospace Solutions, has developed a tracking device powered by solar panels attached to a part of the ULD that tends to sustain least damage. A power converter charges the onboard batteries, which currently allow for a report to be submitted on location and temperature up to 30 times a day.

CHEP’s IT director, Floris Kleijn said: “Our expectation is that we can further reduce the dimension of the solar panel as we believe we have (deliberately) overengineered this element of our solution.

30 times a day may not be needed to drive the business value and we also need to maintain a balance between status reports the ULD sends out and the weight of the tracking device. Our goal is to deliver a solution that weighs no more than 2kg.”

CHEP has not modeled CO2 savings into its business case, but claims there are a number of benefits: “I think the other truly exciting opportunity is our ability to use the various sensors included in the tracking device to report on temperature, excessive shock and much more,” said Kleijn. “Our upcoming trial needs to prove out definitively and in a real environment the energy-harvesting component of the solution. Once that is done, I truly believe that our innovation will offer a wide range of opportunities to our customers, ourselves and indeed the airline industry.industry,” said Kleijn.