Russian retaliation over spiraling sanctions

Russia’s import ban on most food products from the EU and US, along with several other countries including Australia, Canada and Norway in retaliation against the latest round of sanctions over the Ukrainian crisis has seen two neighbouring countries thrust into the role of food transshipment centres.


Russian retaliation over spiraling sanctions


Russia’s import ban on most food products from the EU and US, along with several other countries including Australia, Canada and Norway in retaliation against the latest round of sanctions over the Ukrainian crisis has seen two neighbouring countries thrust into the role of food transshipment centres. Belarus and Kazakhstan have both become conduits for the ‘banned’ food products after Russian President Vladimir Putin announced plans “to prohibit or limit for one year” imports of foodstuffs from states that have imposed sanctions against Russia over Ukraine.

The sanctions, imposed originally over Russia’s annexation of Crimea in March, were widened after last month’s downing of a Malaysian airliner over territory in eastern Ukraine controlled by pro-Moscow rebels who purportedly used a Russian-supplied missile system to shoot the aircraft down, killing all aboard.

Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev said the Russian government was considering banning transit flights for EU and US carriers in retaliation for sanctions over Ukraine. Possible restrictions on over-flights of the country’s airspace by US and EU airlines would add significant fuel expense and lead to cost increases for cargo carried on flights to and from Asia. If the ban were implemented, carriers from the effected countries would have to circumvent the vast territory on their way to Asia by taking a more southerly route, leading across CIS states like Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan.