Data sharing needs to be core of safety: IATA

The International Air Transport Association (IATA) has called on governments and industry to focus on partnerships, data analysis and runway safety in the ongoing quest to make flying even safer during IATA’s OPS Conference, in Kuala Lumpur recently.


Data sharing needs to be core of safety: IATA


The International Air Transport Association (IATA) has called on governments and industry to focus on partnerships, data analysis and runway safety in the ongoing quest to make flying even safer during IATA’s OPS Conference, in Kuala Lumpur recently. Speaking amid the ongoing search for MH370, IATA director general and CEO, Tony Tyler also committed IATA to facilitate a unified industry position on global tracking of aircraft and called on governments to make more effective use of passenger data.

“In 2013, there were over 29 million flights operated on Western-built jet aircraft, with 12 hull losses. That is one accident for every 2.4 million flights and a 14.6 per cent improvement on the five-year industry average. Accidents are rare, but the current search for MH370 is a reminder that we can never be complacent on safety.

It may well a long time before we know exactly what happened on that flight. But it is already clear that we must never let another aircraft go missing in this way. And it is equally clear that governments must make better use of the passenger data that they mandate airlines to provide,” said Tyler.

IATA has established the Global Aviation Data Management (GADM) project which includes data from over 600 sources, making it the most comprehensive collection of industry information, including the STEADES database, audit data from the IATA Safety Audit for Ground Operations and the IATA Operational Safety Audit.