The mystery of MH370

The ever more complicated and deepening mystery surrounding the missing Malaysia Airways flight MH370 continues to grip the world – in equal parts empathy and morbid fascination – as the search now, having shifted yet again, focuses on the South Indian Ocean.


The mystery of MH370


The ever more complicated and deepening mystery surrounding the missing Malaysia Airways flight MH370 continues to grip the world – in equal parts empathy and morbid fascination – as the search now, having shifted yet again, focuses on the South Indian Ocean. At the time of writing the search for debris far off the coast of Western Australia continues.

It may seem odd to be writing about a missing passenger aircraft in this magazine, but this is firstly no ordinary circumstance and secondly, as we all know very well, passenger aircraft are also carry varying amounts of cargo in their bellies.

With absolutely every realistic possibility in the search for answers as to what transpired on that fateful flight open for consideration, cargo also logically comes under scrutiny. Could it be that new nemesis of the air cargo sector – lithium batteries – or perhaps some other hazardous cargo that resulted in an onboard fire? Or perhaps, as it was suggested in the mainstream media that the four tonnes of tropical fruit called mangosteens in the belly of the aircraft, could have concealed a bomb.

According to the carrier’s CEO Ahmad Jauhari Yahya the aircraft was not carrying any hazardous cargo: “We examined the cargo manifest, it carries no hazardous goods. They should actually be checked and screened according to the standard procedure,” he said, confirming that proper cargo screening had been undertaken. Subsequently the airline did say the flight was carrying a limited quantity of small lithium-ion batteries, but they were properly packed.