Validation to meet ACC3 progressing well

With the European Union’s ACC3 cargo security rules fast approaching the 1 July validation deadline, carriers and airports are scrambling to obtain the necessary certification, or face a ban from EU airports.


Validation to meet ACC3 progressing well


With the European Union’s ACC3 cargo security rules fast approaching the 1 July validation deadline, carriers and airports are scrambling to obtain the necessary certification, or face a ban from EU airports.

Any airline uplifting cargo from an airport outside the EU must supply certification from an EU-approved validator which has conducted an audit of the carrier’s cargo security processes and facilities. Countries which have reciprocity agreements with the EU on security are exempted from the requirement.

In India, both Air India and Jet Airways fly to the EU, along with a number of European and Middle East carriers that fly direct from India to Europe. Currently cargo screening at airports in India is done either by the airline, or Bureau of Civil Aviation Security (BCAS)-approved agents. Radharamanan Panicker, group chief executive of Cargo Service Centre that runs terminals in Mumbai and Delhi, said: “I don’t think there will be any problem in India to meet the 1 July deadline. We have been carrying out 100 per cent screening of cargo by BCAS norms.”

The Mumbai International Airport said: “The BCAS regulations meet all the requirements (in cases they exceed EU requirements) except a few procedural changes. These gaps have been identified and are being closed. The processes to bridge these gaps need BCAS approval. “The Mumbai International Airportapproved regulated agent has requested permission from BCAS to undertake the validation. Similarly, some airlines, like British Airways, UPS, Jet Airways and Lufthansa, have also approached BCAS for undertaking independent validations. The whole process is likely to be completed by April-end.”