Air cargo comes to the aid of typhoon-devastated Philippines

The air cargo industry – from carriers, charter brokers, logistics and express companies and others – quickly stepped up and mounted a nearly unprecedented uplift of urgently needed aid to the victims of Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda), which devasted a large swath of the central Philippines with sustained winds of up to 196 km/h and gusts up to 270 km/h.


Air cargo comes to the aid of typhoon-devastated Philippines


The air cargo industry – from carriers, charter brokers, logistics and express companies and others – quickly stepped up and mounted a nearly unprecedented uplift of urgently needed aid to the victims of Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda), which devasted a large swath of the central Philippines with sustained winds of up to 196 km/h and gusts up to 270 km/h. It was an aid response and uplift not seen in Asia since the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami.

While much of it was provided on a commercial basis, the philanthropic side of the industry also shone brightly with both aspects highlighting the invaluable role the air cargo industry plays in not just moving world trade in the good times, but the outpouring of human compassion in the form of aid in crushing disasters such as this.

The massive global humanitarian response from individuals, governments, aid agencies and companies came as nearly 11 million people were seriously affected by Haiyan, which smashed through the Philippines wiping whole towns literally off the map, killing more than 2,200 people, leaving over 3,600 injured and rendering many hundreds of thousands homeless. Food, water, water purification systems, power generators, blankets, plastic tarpaulins, tents, body bags, Land Cruisers, earth movers and medical supplies were all flown in – and still are being to a lesser extent – to the needy, first in the early days of the response via Manila and later through Mactan Cebu International Airport which became the logistics base for the relief action.