A rosier 2014

Once again another year has come to a close. While it’s tempting to gripe about another year best forgotten, it’s getting to be a well-worn, if not patently overused phrase. Undeniably it was another bad year for air cargo and sadly, a situation that the air cargo industry is quite simply starting to get used to.


A rosier 2014


Once again another year has come to a close. While it’s tempting to gripe about another year best forgotten, it’s getting to be a well-worn, if not patently overused phrase. Undeniably it was another bad year for air cargo and sadly, a situation that the air cargo industry is quite simply starting to get used to. Although there surely isn’t an air cargo exec in the world that isn’t aware of the pit-falls of complacency!

But on a rosier note, there are some very real, very tangible signs that next year, could…just maybe, see the real beginnings of some – perhaps mild – form of recovery. With at least three consecutive months of rising cargo volumes in key global markets and no imminent signs of economic disaster in any significant economies around the world, things look at least ‘calm’.

The International Air Transport Association (IATA) Airline Industry Forecast for the next five years also imbues some optimism into the situation, although the word ‘forecast’ has become a bit of dirty word over the last three years. According to IATA’s projection, the period 2013-2017 shows international freight volumes are expected to grow 17 per cent over the next five years. According to the airline group, this consensus outlook incorporates a “conservative estimate” of the recovery in global economic activity and world trade volumes over the coming years.