Oman Air and Port of Salalah tap sea-air cargo

The Port of Salalah and Oman Air have signed an agreement opening up a new sea-air cargo corridor through the Port of Salalah between Asia and Europe cutting 48 hours from the current transit time and 20 per cent in handling costs when compared to the current comparative products available in the market today.


CCO Oman Air


Oman Air and Port of Salalah tap sea-air cargo

The Port of Salalah and Oman Air have signed an agreement opening up a new sea-air cargo corridor through the Port of Salalah between Asia and Europe cutting 48 hours from the current transit time and 20 per cent in handling costs when compared to the current comparative products available in the market today. The two have recently completed a series of successful sea-air freight trials from Salalah airport to Munich and Milan, according to a report in the Times of Oman. The new route offers a total transportation time of 16 days from Hong Kong to Frankfurt, Munich, Milan or Paris. The Port of Salalah’s CEO Peter Ford said: “We are happy to be able to work with Oman Air to offer transit times to Frankfurt and Milan that are lower than the current port routing in the region and offer significant value to customers in terms of product positioning and net working capital. Oman’s strategic location is now being utilised by airlines like Oman Air to make sea-air an attractive new business through Salalah.” Abdulrazaq Alraisi, CCO at Oman Air, added: “We are already seeing a great deal of interest in our sea-air cargo operations through Salalah. The Port of Salalah currently manages more than 36 weekly vessel connections to and from Europe and Asia and more than 45 weekly vessel connections to and from regional ports, as well as handling over 3.5 million containers each year. These figures are set to increase and Oman Air has been working with the Port of Salalah for some time to develop this new sea-air product.” Ford added that the service is targeting fast-moving consumer goods like electronics. “Typically, computers have a shelf life of 30 days. They cannot have it sitting in a container for very long because the technology is already ageing as soon as it leaves the factory,” he said. Ford added: “Coming from Asia, combine the best of both worlds.” Preliminary tests showed that sea-air services can get South East Asian goods into Europe 48 hours quicker than the same service from Dubai-based market leaders Jebel Ali – and at the same price, added Ford.