Air Canada taps network to offset Asia decline

Those peering into their crystal balls hope 2012 will be a better year for air cargo, but executives at Air Canada Cargo (ACC) are being realistic.


Air Canada taps network to offset Asia decline


Those peering into their crystal balls hope 2012 will be a better year for air cargo, but executives at Air Canada Cargo (ACC) are being realistic. “As we finished off 2011, we hit depths that were lower than the ones we had in 2009,” says Garry Blagrave, Air Canada Cargo’s director for Cargo Sales and Services, Asia Pacific. “Going into 2012, everyone is talking about a flat first half. From what we’re seeing during the first couple of weeks of January, it sure looks like that.”

His remarks are not directed toward Air Canada Cargo specifically, although ACC is Canada’s largest provider of air cargo services between Canada and major markets in the United States, Europe, Asia, South America, and Australia. They relate to air cargo industry wide and in fact, Blagrave’s comments are typical of what cargo executives are saying today.

What everyone wants to know, however, is when will this downward trend end and what are carriers doing about it. If only anyone could answer that. Short term, Blagrave, who works out of Air Canada Cargo’s Shanghai office, points out that leading into the Chinese New Year, there’s always a flurry of activity. Consequently, he observes, air carriers are finally seeing some upward momentum. “But that should have started after the Western New Year holiday,” he adds.