AMERICAS: Air traffic up substantially in 2010: ICAO

Passenger and freight air traffic grew substantially in 2010 as positive economic prospects worldwide overshadowed the depressed levels of 2009 caused by the global financial crisis, according to the UN International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). In a report on trends compiled annually for its members, said the substantial growth in traffic reflects positive economic prospects […]


Passenger and freight air traffic grew substantially in 2010 as positive economic prospects worldwide overshadowed the depressed levels of 2009 caused by the global financial crisis, according to the UN International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). In a report on trends compiled annually for its members, said the substantial growth in traffic reflects positive economic prospects worldwide – based on a forecast of a four per cent increase in the world’s real gross domestic product. ICAO said cargo volumes in 2010 – measured in freight-tonne kilometers performed – posted a dramatic jump of 18.9 per cent after a sharp decline of 11 per cent the previous year. The jump in cargo traffic was in with a sharp rebound in global trade and its largest increase in three decades. The number of passengers carried in 2010 was up 6.3 per cent over 2009, at some 2.5 billion passengers. The recovery in cargo traffic was led by the Asia/Pacific region, with an increase of 24.8 per cent, while all regions posted double-digit growth, the highest being the Middle East at 34.1 per cent. International passenger traffic grew by 8.8 per cent, led by a strong rebound in business and leisure longhaul travel, particularly in emerging markets such as the so-called BRIC countries – Brazil, Russia, India and China – where outgoing tourism flourished, the report said. The largest percentage growth was registered by the airlines of the Middle East with 21 per cent, followed by those of the Asia/Pacific region with 12.9 per cent, Latin America with 11.4 per cent and Africa with 10 per cent. Traffic in the mature markets of North America and Europe grew by 6.2 per cent and 6.7 per cent, respectively. The lower growth figures relate to a larger traffic base and still represent significant increases.