Sharjah offers regional and transit advantages

Sharjah International Airport (SHJ)found its place on the world aviationmap in 1932 when ImperialAirways – the forerunners of BritishAirways – first constructed an airfieldas a stopover en route to India and Australia.At that time, Sharjah ranked as oneof its most remote outposts, as well asbeing the first airport in the United ArabEmirates. Times have certainly […]


Sharjah International Airport (SHJ)found its place on the world aviationmap in 1932 when ImperialAirways – the forerunners of BritishAirways – first constructed an airfieldas a stopover en route to India and Australia.At that time, Sharjah ranked as oneof its most remote outposts, as well asbeing the first airport in the United ArabEmirates. Times have certainly changed.

Today, business at SHJ is bustling, despite a worldwide economic slowdown. In the first three-quarters of 2009, some 4.24 million passengers passed through SHJ, up eight per cent, and cargo volumes reached 373,745 tonnes, an increase of 35,646 tonnes over the same period 2008. Flights rose to a record 45,022 from 44,086 in 2008.

The sea-air connection
One of SHJ’s claims to fame is its status as the world’s second largest sea-air cargo airport after Seattle. A major benefit, Sharjah is strategically located between Europe and the Far East. Furthermore, during these times when shippers are scrutinising costs, sea-air offers an optimum balance between cost and time and is being increasingly used by cargo agents and freight forwarders.

According to SHJ officials, for example, cargo routed by sea-air from Tokyo to Frankfurt via Sharjah saves up to 40 per cent of the cost of pure air-freight, while slashing a third of the time taken by ship-only mode.