IATA applauds EC’s post-volcano measures

The International Air Transport Association (IATA) applauded the announcement by the European Commission of a comprehensive programme to provide relief to the air transport sector in the aftermath of extraordinary airspace closures resulting from the ash plume of an Icelandic volcano. The global airline association estimates that the Icelandic volcano crisis cost airlines more than […]


The International Air Transport Association (IATA) applauded the announcement by the European Commission of a comprehensive programme to provide relief to the air transport sector in the aftermath of extraordinary airspace closures resulting from the ash plume of an Icelandic volcano.

The global airline association estimates that the Icelandic volcano crisis cost airlines more than US$1.7 billion in lost revenue through in the first six days after the initial eruption, during which Europe’s airspace was closed. For a three-day period (17-19 April), when disruptions were greatest, lost revenues reached $400 million per day, according to IATA.

“Lost revenues now total more than $1.7 billion for airlines alone. At the worst, the crisis impacted 29 Per cent of global aviation and affected 1.2 million passengers a day. The scale of the crisis eclipsed 9/11 when US airspace was closed for three days,” said Giovanni Bisignani, IATA’s director general and CEO.

“I applaud Vice Presidents Kallas, Almunia and Rehn for their quick action,” said Bisignani of the EC’s annoucement ofmeasures to assist carriers. “These urgent measures will provide much neededassistance to airlines at a time when theirfinancial resources are stretched,” he said.

IATA highlighted its particular support for three longer-term elements of the European announcement, in particular the need for a Single European Sky. “The events of last week clearly showed the need for the Single European Sky. I fully support Vice President Kallas in his efforts to accelerate the appointment of a European Network Manager by the end of this year.