Going green

I have to declare myself a green leaning member of the global community. I think in part it comes from university days in which summers were spend earning money planting trees on the west coast of Canada where the rampant excesses of clear-cut logging stretched on as far as the eye could see. I say […]



I have to declare myself a green leaning member of the global community. I think in part it comes from university days in which summers were spend earning money planting trees on the west coast of Canada where the rampant excesses of clear-cut logging stretched on as far as the eye could see. I say ‘green leaning’ because of course with age, pragmatism takes hold and the environmental urge becomes somewhat muted. But still I try, even though the simple act of recycling in Asia is a challenge because of the pervasive mentality that new and disposable is good and environmental problems are someone else’s problem.

But clearly the environmental mess, in which humanity has put itself, is everyone’s problem. I look at my two young daughters with sadness because of the awful legacy successive generations have bequeathed their generation. Much of the world has finally come to grips with the need for action, and urgent action at that. But probably it is far too late to reverse much of the damage that has been done; at best we can only slow things from getting dramatically worse.

It seems apparent that one area that would have a dramatic positive impact is kicking our terrible addiction to fossil fuels. Think not only of the environment but the horrendous cost and suffering of wars fought over oil. The current race and inherent enthusiasm to perfect bio-fuels – as part of a larger search for alternative fuel sources – suitable to replace hydrocarbon fuels is not only impressive, but admirable for its speed, scope and relatively coordinated and cooperative process.