IATA matters

In giving his E-freight update, Peter Chong, director IATA Cargo Services Asia Pacific noted that “great strides” had been made since 2006/7 and by next year 20 documents representing 64 per cent of paper volume will be converted to electronic format. In 2009 the number will be 16 with Dangerous Goods being converted later this […]


CASS dangerous goods Director IATA Cargo Services Asia Pacific e-freight electronic format Peter Chong


In giving his E-freight update, Peter Chong, director IATA Cargo Services Asia Pacific noted that “great strides” had been made since 2006/7 and by next year 20 documents representing 64 per cent of paper volume will be converted to electronic format. In 2009 the number will be 16 with Dangerous Goods being converted later this year. E-freight was implemented in three new Asia Pacific locations last year, including South Korea, Australia and New Zealand and since 31 December 2008, 18 locations and 25 airports have gone ‘live’, including South Korea, Hong Kong, Australia and Singapore. “Japan will go live later this year and that will see a huge jump in volumes,” Chong said.

The goal is to expand in three ways – the number of locations, the number of documents and expanding penetration in countries where the system is already live. The target is to reach 80 per cent of international freight in each airport where E-freight is live. This year will see three more locations in Asia Pacific: Malaysia which went online at KLIA in end-May; Japan which will go live in the first week of July; and Taiwan with two locations – Taipei and Kaohsiung.

By 2010 IATA is hoping to have 44 locations and 76 airports including the top five air freight markets representing 80 per cent of international trade, up and running with E-freight. Chong also acknowledged that some markets in the Asia Pacific region are going to be “very difficult” to implement E-freight. These include countries like Myanmar, Cambodia, etc. and specifically countries which have not ratified the Montreal Convention (MC99) such as the Philippines, Thailand, Indonesia. Thailand he noted, is currently drafting its own national legislation which essentially mirrors MC99 and that willlikely enable E-freight to proceed there.