Murphy’s Law of air cargo…

Just when you thought things couldn’t get any worse. As if the economic downturn wasn’t enough, we now have the looming threat of a global Swine Flu pandemic. As the world watches and waits, the nasty hybrid of a virus is slowly creeping its way around the world. Sitting here in tiny Singapore we all […]


Just when you thought things couldn’t get any worse. As if the economic downturn wasn’t enough, we now have the looming threat of a global Swine Flu pandemic. As the world watches and waits, the nasty hybrid of a virus is slowly creeping its way around the world.

Sitting here in tiny Singapore we all wait for what the health authorities say is the inevitable spread from the one infected person on the island to the general population. At press time the count has already reached seven and the situation is repeating itself around the world.

But whether this will turn into the dreaded pandemic is not clear. It now appears at this stage that the virus is not as ferocious as first thought…but this could change. The question then, is what impact this would have on already fragile global supply chains and ultimately on the air cargo industry.

If the Mexican example mild as it was, is anything to go by global supply chains and the air cargo industry would likely be in serious trouble in the event of a pandemic. Consumers have unwittingly become highly dependent on sophisticated supply chains for everything from daily consumer goods, to food to pharmaceuticals. The just-in-time facet of modern supply chains means inventory levels are kept at the barest minimum and disruption in supply would rapidly impact economies the world over.