Monitored approach

Here’s a little item we came across which once again gives credence to the theory that there are just some things that go on behind the scenes of important operations…like flying a plane…which you just don’t really want to know about. What follows below is an official operational notice that British Airways sent to its […]


Here’s a little item we came across which once again gives credence to the theory that there are just some things that go on behind the scenes of important operations…like flying a plane…which you just don’t really want to know about.

What follows below is an official operational notice that British Airways sent to its pilots explaining what in the US is refereed to as the “monitored approach” method. But before we get to that, here is how it was explained to the slightly technically challenged Belly Achers by an expert.

In essence this is a specific approach technique used in very low visibility and ceiling in which one pilot flies the approach and when the other pilot sees the runway he takes control of the plane and lands.

This removes the problem of the pilot having to make the transition from flying instruments and at the last minute looking outside and “getting his bearings” as the other pilot is already “outside”. If the pilot not flying says nothing by the time they reach “minimums”, the pilot flying automatically starts the “go-around” procedure as he is still on the instruments.

And so, here is the official British Airways explanation of the procedure – and remember, English isn’t called ‘English’ for nothing!