The glass half full

Pessimism: The feeling that things will turn out badly. A general disposition to look on the dark side and to expect the worst in all things. Definitions vary in degrees but in essence this is it – pessimism is all about seeing the glass half empty. Optimism, on the other hand sees the glass half […]


Pessimism: The feeling that things will turn out badly. A general disposition to look on the dark side and to expect the worst in all things.

Definitions vary in degrees but in essence this is it – pessimism is all about seeing the glass half empty. Optimism, on the other hand sees the glass half full.

Today, as this magazine is about to go to print I think the air cargo world – and by extension the rest of the global economic system by virtue of air cargo’s leading position as an indicator of the world’s economic health – heard for the first time in at least a handful of months, that the glass is, perhaps only in the tiniest fraction fuller than emptier.

One of the world’s foremost authorities in terms of analysing and understanding the trends impacting the world’s airlines – the International Air Transport Association (IATA) – has stepped up and said: “There may be some light at the end of the tunnel with air freight”.

It may not seem like much, but in reality it’s a weighty statement, intoxicating with the faintest visceral aroma of optimism. My hat goes off to IATA’s chief economist, Brian Pierce – who undoubtably has poured over his numbers – for having the courage to step up and be essentially, contrarian.