Altimeter at fault in air crash

A faulty altimeter played a part in the Turkish crash last week near Amsterdam’s Schipol airport which killed nine people, according to investigators. They said similar shutdowns had occurred twice before on the same plane and were overruled by the pilots, and warned its maker Boeing and any airlines using 737 models to be vigilant. […]


Altimeter Amsterdam crash Schipol Turkish


A faulty altimeter played a part in the Turkish crash last week near Amsterdam’s Schipol airport which killed nine people, according to investigators. They said similar shutdowns had occurred twice before on the same plane and were overruled by the pilots, and warned its maker Boeing and any airlines using 737 models to be vigilant. When flying at about 1950 feet (594 metres) the plane’s left radio altimeter indicated the Boeing 737-800 was flying at minus 8 feet, prompting the automatic pilot to shut down the engines, the Dutch Safety Board said on Wednesday. “The crew initially did not react to these events,” Dutch Safety Board head Pieter van Vollenhoven told reporters. When an alarm went off that the plane’s speed would drop below the minimum, the pilots reacted and reignited the engines. “But the plane was too low at 150 metres. As a consequence the plane crashed 1 kilometre before the runway,” said Van Vollenhoven. “The reason to go public now already is to warn Boeing and all users of this plane type that vigilance is required with regards to the altimeter,” he said.