The day has finally arrived

That day, was 1 February, from which point the US’ controversial cargo screening programme for cargo carried on passenger aircraft kicked in. In actual fact it began earlier in October from which point the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) required that 100 per cent of cargo carried on narrow-body aircraft be screened. But this has been […]


That day, was 1 February, from which point the US’ controversial cargo screening programme for cargo carried on passenger aircraft kicked in. In actual fact it began earlier in October from which point the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) required that 100 per cent of cargo carried on narrow-body aircraft be screened. But this has been described as “low hanging fruit” because the volumes were relatively small.

Freight forwarders and carriers have been living in fear of a potential log-jam resulting TSA’s requirement that 50 per cent of all cargo carried on wide-body passenger aircraft in the US – both domestic and international – be screened starting from 1 February and 100 per cent by August 2010.

The concerns centre around lack of space and infrastructure at many US airports and the lack of feasibility for most carriers to undertake the screening. The TSA’s solution was to push the screening back along the supply chain, away from the airport, leaving it in the hands of shippers, freight forwarders, etc.

Hence, the Certified Cargo Shipping Program. Freight forwarders, shippers, and facilities, such as warehouses and airports, can voluntarily enroll to become certified shipping facilities. Ultimately these will be places where screening equipment can be positioned that has been certified by TSA.