From sea to air

With the fi rst issue of Payload Asia under my belt I look forward to working with the air freight and related industries on futureissues of Asia’s best read air freight specialist magazine. While much of my reporting career has focused on the business of sea freight, many of the issues share signifi cant commonalities– […]


With the fi rst issue of Payload Asia under my belt I look forward to working with the air freight and related industries on futureissues of Asia’s best read air freight specialist magazine.

While much of my reporting career has focused on the business of sea freight, many of the issues share signifi cant commonalities– headhaul versus backhaul imbalances, over-capacityissues, terminal congestion, to name only a few. Other issuesare virtually carbon copies between the sea and air sectors – USsecurity initiatives and environmental concerns, for instance.

I will certainly miss the ocean freight sector with all its eccentricities and industry players who are so clearly committed and passionate about raising the standards of what has moved from a sometimes dubious, time-weathered, traditional industryto become a modern-day professional business.

But having met quite a number of air industry leaders at the Air Freight Asia 2007 event in Hong Kong last month, I have no doubt that the air freight industry is equally if not more imbued with, not only interesting characters, but profoundly professional business executives bent on ensuring a healthy, profi tableand responsible industry.

Over the coming months I hope to meet more of you and look forward to exploring topics of interest to the industry and hearing your feedback and suggestions asto how Payload Asia can better meet your needs.