AMERICAN GATEWAYS FOR ASIA~ IAH offers gateway and carrier mix advantages

With carriers expanding their service and others soon to enter the market, optimism for growth at Houston Bush IntercontinentalAirport (IAH) is high. Coming in December, Emirates Airlines will connect Houston to Dubai non-stop three times weekly, but will expand to daily service by mid 2008. The UAE-based carrier will utilise 777-200LR aircraft on the route. […]


With carriers expanding their service and others soon to enter the market, optimism for growth at Houston Bush IntercontinentalAirport (IAH) is high.

Coming in December, Emirates Airlines will connect Houston to Dubai non-stop three times weekly, but will expand to daily service by mid 2008. The UAE-based carrier will utilise 777-200LR aircraft on the route. While this aircraft has the capability of hauling up to 18 tonnes of cargo, Genaro Pena, Houston Airport System (HAS) marketing director, estimates that Emirates will initially haul three to fi ve tonnes outbound fromHouston per fl ight.

“Initially, the cargo will be limited,” says Pena. “But the new service will lead to more opportunities and help them develop business.” Pena says. HAS officials also believe this will help IAH attract more service to that part of the world since Emirates will improve Houston’s quality of air service.

The reasons for Emirates Airlines entering the Houston market are signifi cant. For one, the carrier was attracted to Houston because of its long ties to the Middle East via the petroleum industry. But more signifi cant, Houston is a big and vibrant market. Beyond petroleum, the region is rich with high tech industries stretching from medical, aerospace and information technology businesses. Companies such as Dell, Hewlett Packard, Samsung (based in Austin) and others that also stretch along the US-Mexican border offer a good product mix for both inbound andoutbound cargo hauls.