United Airlines experiences better growth on Atlantic, domestic side of business

As is the case with many carriers today, United Airlines’ cargo fi gures so far this year are not in sync with Boeing World Air Cargo Forecast projections for 6.1 percent growth per year. The reason is China, previously the enginefor cargo growth. "The market has not been as strong this year as anticipated," comments […]


As is the case with many carriers today, United Airlines’ cargo fi gures so far this year are not in sync with Boeing World Air Cargo Forecast projections for 6.1 percent growth per year. The reason is China, previously the enginefor cargo growth.

"The market has not been as strong this year as anticipated," comments Neel Shah, United Cargo vice president sales and marketing. With so many carriers now actively serving Asia — especially China, rates are now more competitive. Consequently, yields for individual carriers on Pacifi c lanes are off considerably.

"There is a lot more capacity, and this has caught up with demand," Shah says. Simply put: China is no longer the goose that is laying the golden eggs. Instead the Pacifi c is now one of the more challenging trade routes in the industry.

Whereby, up until recently opportunities in China seemed bountiful, now carriers like United are having to scrap around to fi ll their planes. "It‘s getting harder and harder," Shah comments. United offers three fl ights daily to Beijing from Washington, D.C.; Chicago, and San Francisco. It also has two fl ights daily to Shanghai from Chicago and San Francisco. In addition, United fl ies to Hong Kong twice daily from Chicago and San Francisco, and will commence another service to Hong Kong from LosAngeles in October.